Welcome
Home
THE COURT
    Overview of the Appellate Division
    Justices of the Court
    The Courthouse
DECISIONS
    Latest Decisions
    Decision Release Dates
    Search
CLERKS OFFICE
    Clerk and Deputy Clerk of the Court
    Contact Information
    Terms of the Court
    Court Calendars
    Rules of Practice
    Frequently Asked Questions
    Forms and Practice Aids
    Latest Court News
    Employment Opportunities
ATTORNEY MATTERS
    Admission to the Bar
    Attorney Discipline
    Attorney Registration Delinquency
    Registration as In-House Counsel
    Retirement
    Voluntary Resignation
PROGRAMS & AUXILIARY AGENCIES
    Assigned Counsel Program
    Attorneys for Children Program
    Attorney Grievance Committees
    Court Examiners
    Indep. Judicial Election Qual. Comm.
    Law Library
    Mental Hygiene Legal Service
    Pro Bono Policy and Program
RELATED LINKS
   Court sites
   Legal sites



 

BIOGRAPHIES of FORMER JUSTICES of

the APPELLATE DIVISION, FOURTH DEPARTMENT


George A. Hardin, was born in the Town of Winfield, Herkimer County, on August 17, 1832. He graduated from Union College in 1852 and was admitted to practice in 1854. From 1858 to 1861 he served as the Herkimer County District Attorney. He was elected to the Supreme Court in 1871 and in 1881 he was assigned by Governor Cornell to the General Term of the Fourth Judicial District. In 1884 he was named as Presiding Justice of the General Term by Governor Cleveland and in 1895 was designated first Presiding Justice of the Appellate Division, Fourth Department by Governor Morton. He retired from the bench in 1899 and died on April 16, 1901.

David L. Follett, was born in Norich, Chenango County, on August 23, 1836. For nine years he served on the trial bench. In 1884, he was assigned as an Associate Justice by Governor Cleveland to the General Term of the Fourth Department. In 1888 a second division of the Court of Appeals was organized by Governor Hill and he was chosen Chief Judge by his associates. When this division was dissolved, Justice Follett was assigned as an Associate Justice to the General Term of the First Department. In 1896, when the Appellate Division, Fourth Department, was organized, he was designated as one of its first five Associate Justices and served in this capacity until his death on July 5, 1899.

William H. Adams, was born in the Village of Lyons, Wayne County, New York in 1841. He studied law and was admitted to practice in 1864. He became a Justice of the Supreme Court in January, 1888 and in 1896 was designated to the Appellate Division, Fourth Department. He was appointed as Presiding Justice in 1899 following the retirement of Presiding Justice Hardin and held this position until his death on October 12, 1903.

Manley C. Green, was born in 1843 in Sardinia, New York. He was admitted to practice in Rochester, New York in 1874 and practiced law in Buffalo until he was elected as a Justice of the Supreme Court in 1891. In 1895 he was appointed by Governor Morton to serve as one of its first five Associate Justices of the Fourth Appellate Division, serving from January 1, 1896 until his death on October 10, 1898.

Hamilton Ward, was born in Salisbury, New York on July 3, 1829. He was admitted to the bar on July 2, 1851. In 1856 he was elected District Attorney of Allegany County. He was elected to the Congress of the United States in 1864 where he served three terms and was elected as New York State Attorney General in 1879. He was appointed to the Supreme Court in 1891 and to the General Term in 1895. He was designated as an Associate Justice of the Appellate Division, Fourth Department on January 20, 1896 and served as one of its first five members until his death on December 27, 1898.

Peter Baillie McLennan, was born on a farm in the Town of Lyndon, Cattaraugus County in 1850. He graduated from Alfred University in 1873, was admitted to the bar in 1876 and practiced law in Syracuse. He was elected Supreme Court Justice in 1892 and was designated to this Court in 1898. He was appointed Presiding Justice by Governor Odell in 1903 following the death of Justice Adams, and reappointed by Governor Hughes as Presiding Justice in 1903, serving in this capacity until his death on May 8, 1913.

Alfred Spring, was born in Franklinville on February 19, 1851. He attended Michigan University for two years and studied law in the office of his father. He was admitted to practice in 1875 and, thereafter, served as Surrogate for two terms. He was appointed in January 1895 by Governor Morton as a Supreme Court Justice and elected to this position in November of that year. He was designated to this Court by Governor Roosevelt in January 1899 and served on the Court until his death on October 22, 1912.

Edwin Adolphus Nash, was born in Bedford Canada in October 26, 1936. Justice Nash attended Albany Law School and was admitted to practice in 1860. He practiced law in Lima until 1869 when he was elected as Livingston County District Attorney. In 1878 he was elected as Livingston County Judge and Surrogate and in 1895 he was elected to the Supreme Court. He was designated to the Appellate Division in 1899 and again in 1902, serving during the absence of several Justices due to illness. In 1905 he was designated to the Court by Governor Higgins to replace Justice Stover who retired. He retired from the bench in 1906 and died in 1911.

Walter Lloyd Smith, was born in Elmira, New York in 1856. He graduated from Princeton University in 1877 and was admitted to practice in 1879. In 1888 he was appointed by Governor Hill as a Supreme Court Justice and elected to this position in the November general election. In 1899 he was designated as an Associate Justice of the Appellate Division, Fourth Department. In 1901 he was transferred to the Third Department, where he served as an Associate Justice and later became Presiding Justice. In 1915 he was designated by Governor Whitman to the Appellate Division, First Department. His term in that Court expired in 1925 and he died on March 5, 1928.

Pardon C. Williams, was born in Ellisburgh, Jefferson County on July 12, 1842. He attended St. Lawrence University and was admitted to practice in October, 1863. He practiced law in Watertown and later became District Attorney of Jefferson County. He was elected to the Supreme Court in 1885 and re-elected following the expiration of his first term. He was designated to the Appellate Division, First Department as one of its first Associate Justices in 1896 and designated to the Fourth Department in 1901. He served as an Associate Justice in this Court until December 31, 1911 when his term expired. He died on January 18, 1925.

Frank C. Laughlin, was born in Newstead, New York on July 20, 1859. He was admitted to practice in 1882 and was elected to the Supreme Court in 1895. In 1901 he was designated to this Court and in 1902 was designated as an Associate Justice of the Appellate Division, First Department. He resigned from that Court in August 1922.

William Rumsey, was born in Bath, New York in 1841. He was admitted to practice in 1868, elected to the Supreme Court in 1880 and was designated to the Appellate Division, First Department as one of its first Associate Justices in 1896 and to the Appellate Division, Fourth Department in 1901, retiring in October of that year. He died on January 16, 1903.

Frank Harris Hiscock, was born in Tully, New York on April 16, 1856. He graduated from Cornell University in 1875 and was admitted to practice in 1878. He was elected to the Supreme Court in 1896 and designated to this Court in 1901. He was appointed as an Associate Justice of the Court of Appeals in 1906. In 1916 he was elected Chief Judge of that Court and served in this capacity until his retirement in 1926. In 1935 he became an Official Referee of the Court of Appeals. He died on July 2, 1946.

John M. Davy, was born in Ottawa, Canada in June 29, 1835. He moved to Rochester, New York where he studied law and was admitted to practice in 1863. He became District Attorney of Monroe County in 1868 and served in that position until 1871. He was elected in 1888 to the Supreme Court and was re-elected in 1902. He was designated to serve on this Court temporarily in 1901 and again in 1902. He died on December 31, 1905.

Judge Martin L. Stover, was born on October 10, 1845 in Waterloo, New York. After his graduation at Wittenberg College, he studied law and was admitted to practice in 1870. He was elected to the New York State Assembly in 1874. He became a Justice of the Supreme Court and served on the trial bench from 1891 to 1904. He was designated to the Appellate Division in 1904 and served on this Court for one year, retiring in 1905. He died on June 7, 1921.

Frederick W. Kruse, was born in Merklenberg-Schwerin, Germany on June 25, 1852. He was educated in Springville, New York and was admitted to practice in 1877. He practiced law in Arcade and Olean, New York and was a member of the New York State Assembly from 1884 to 1887. He was elected County Judge of Cattaraugus County in 1897. He was appointed to the Supreme Court by Governor Roosevelt in 1900 and was elected to that position in the next general election. He was designated to this Court in 1906. In 1913 he became the Presiding Justice and served in this capacity until 1922, when his Supreme Court term expired. He died on March 18, 1938.

James A. Robson, was born in Gorham, Ontario County, in 1851. He was admitted to practice in 1870. He was appointed as a Supreme Court Justice in 1903 and elected to that Court in the next general election. He was appointed as an Associate Justice of this Court on January 1, 1907 and served in this capacity until his death on February 1, 1916.

Nathaniel Foote, was born in Morrisville, Madison County, in 1849. He graduated from Hamilton College and was admitted to practice in 1870. In 1905 he was appointed a Justice of the Supreme Court. In 1912 he was designated as Associate Justice of this Court. The term of Judge Foote expired on December 31, 1919. He died on January 26, 1944.

John S. Lambert, was born in Johnsonville, New York in 1851. He was admitted to practice in 1877 and practiced law in Fredonia. He was elected as the Chautauqua County Judge in 1882 and served in that capacity until 1890 when he was appointed as a Supreme Court Judge. He was designated as an Associate Justice of the Appellate Division First Department in 1907. He served on that Court until 1912 when he was designated as an Associate Justice of this Court. He retired on December 31, 1921 when his Supreme Court term expired.

Edgar S. K. Merrell, was born in Lowville, New York in 1865. He was admitted to practice in 1889 and practiced law at Lowville until he became County Judge and Surrogate of Lewis County on January 1, 1903. In 1910 he was elected to the Supreme Court and was designated to this Court in 1913. In 1918 he was designated by Governor Whitman to the Appellate Division, First Department serving in that Court until the expiration of his term on December 31, 1935. He died on December 5, 1942.

Pasqual C. J. DeAngelis, was born in 1849. An active practitioner in Oneida County, he was elected to the Supreme Court in 1907. He served as an Associate Justice of this Court from 1916 to 1920. He died at the age of eighty-three on May 2, 1932.

Irving G. Hubbs, was born in Sandy Creek, New York in 1870. He graduated from Cornell University in 1891. He practiced law in Parish and Pulaski. He was elected to the Supreme Court in 1918 and was designated as an Associate Justice of our Court, becoming Presiding Justice in 1923. In 1928 Judge Hubbs was elected as an Associate Justice of the Court of Appeals. He resigned in 1939. He died on July 22, 1952.

William W. Clark, was born at Elgin, Illinois in 1858. He was admitted to practice in 1897 and engaged in the practice of law from 1897 to 1915. He became District Attorney of Steuben County in 1892 and held the post for 10 years until he was appointed to the County Court. He was elected to the Supreme Court in 1906 and designated as an Associate Justice of the Appellate Division, Fourth Department in 1920, serving on the Court until his term expired December 31, 1928. He died in 1949.

Rowland L. Davis, was born in Dryden, New York in 1871. He practiced law from 1897 to 1915. He was elected to the Supreme Court in 1915 and was designated an Associate Justice of the Appellate Division, Fourth Department in 1921. He served on this Court until 1926 when he was designated to the Appellate Division, Third Department. In 1931 he was designated to the Appellate Division, Second Department. He resigned from that Court in 1935.

Charles Brown Sears, was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1870. He graduated from Yale College in 1892. He attended the University of Berlin for one year. He was admitted to practice in 1895 and practiced law in Buffalo. He was appointed to the Supreme Court in 1917 and designated to the this Court in 1922. On January 1, 1929, Justice Sears became Presiding Justice and on January 3, 1940, was appointed by Governor Lehman as an Associate Justice of the Court of Appeals. He retired on December 31, 1940 and was appointed an Official Referee of the Court of Appeals.

Leonard C. Crouch, was born in Kingston, New York, in 1866. He graduated from Cornell University in 1889. He was admitted to practice in 1891. He practiced law in Kingston and Syracuse and was appointed to the Supreme Court in 1913. He was designated to this Court in 1923. In 1932 Justice Crouch was appointed a Justice of the Court of Appeals and retired from that Court at the end of 1936.

Harry L. Taylor, was born in Halsey Valley, New York in 1866. He received his law degree from Cornell University Law School in 1893. During the summer months between 1888 and 1894, Justice Taylor was a major league professional baseball player. He hung up his mitt and was admitted to practice in 1894. He practiced law in Buffalo and was elected as Erie County Judge in 1906. In 1913, he was elected to the Supreme Court and was designated as an Associate Justice of this Court in 1923, a position that he held until his retirement at age 70 in 1936. Thereafter, he served as an official referee from 1937 to 1944. Justice Taylor died on July 12, 1955.

S. Nelson Sawyer, was born in Palmyra, New York in 1858. He received his law degree from Albany Law School. He served as District Attorney of Wayne County for two terms. He was appointed to the Supreme Court in 1907 and in 1926 was designated as an additional Associate Justice of this Court. He retired on December 31, 1928.

Ernest I. Edgcomb, was born in Cortland, New York in 1867. He graduated from Syracuse University and was admitted to practice in 1891. He was appointed to the Supreme Court by Governor Miller in 1922 and was designated to this Court on November 28, 1928. He retired on December 31, 1937. Justice Edgcomb died on June 7, 1943.

Robert F. Thompson, was born in Canandaigua, New York in 1870. He was admitted to practice in 1894 and practiced law at Canandaigua, New York until 1899 when he was elected as District Attorney for Ontario County. He was appointed to the Supreme Court in 1916 and, on January 1, 1929, was designated as an Associate Justice of this Court, serving until his death on April 7, 1937.

Harley N. Crosby, was born in Parish, New York in 1873. He graduated from Cornell University in 1896. He practiced law at Falconer, New York and was elected a Justice of the Supreme Court in 1922. On January 1, 1929 he was designated to this Court and became Presiding Justice on January 1, 1940. He retired on December 31, 1943 and died on April 26, 1955.

Edmund H. Lewis, was born in Syracuse, New York in 1884. He graduated from Yale University in 1907. He was admitted to practice in 1909 and practiced law in Syracuse. He was elected to the Supreme Court in 1930 and was designated to this Court in 1933. On January 3, 1940, he was appointed to the Court of Appeals and on January 1, 1941, was elected for a full term of fourteen years to that Court. He died in 1972.

Benjamin B. Cunningham, was born in Rochester, New York in 1874. He studied law in the office of W. B. Crittenden in Rochester and he was admitted to practice in 1895. He practiced law in Rochester and became a Justice of the Supreme Court in 1920. On January 1, 1937, Judge Cunningham was designated to sit temporarily as an additional Associate Justice of this Court by Governor Lehman. On January 1, 1944, he became Presiding Justice. He retired at the age of 70 on December 31, 1944 and was appointed an Official Referee. Judge Cunningham died January 2, 1946.

Marsh N. Taylor, was born in Newton, Kansas, in 1883. He graduated from Albany Law School and was admitted to practice in 1905. He practiced law in Rochester until he joined the Monroe County District Attorney's Office in 1911, becoming First Assistant District Attorney in 1920. He was elected to the Supreme Court in 1927. In 1937, Judge Taylor was designated as an Associate Justice of the Appellate Division, Fourth Department, by Governor Lehman. He was appointed as Presiding Justice by Governor Thomas E. Dewey on January 3, 1945. He died in office on August 15, 1953.

William F. Dowling, was born in the Town of Marshall, Oneida County, New York, in 1877. Following his graduation from Hamilton College in 1904, he studied law in a law office and was admitted to practice in 1907. He was elected to the Supreme Court in 1926. On January 1, 1938, he was appointed to the Appellate Division, Fourth Department. He retired December 31, 1947 at age 70. He died November 2, 1948.

Samuel J. Harris, was born in Buffalo, New York in 1877. He graduated from the University of Buffalo School of Law and was admitted to practice in 1907. He was elected to the Supreme Court in 1924 and re-elected in 1938. He was designated to this Court on January 1, 1940. He retired at age 70 on December 31, 1947.

Francis D. McCurn, was born in Westernmill, New York in 1889. He was educated at the Rome Free Academy and received his law degree from the Syracuse College of Law. He practiced law in Syracuse and was appointed as a Supreme Court Justice in 1934. However, he was unsuccessful in the subsequent election. He was reappointed to the Supreme Court on November 4, 1937 and was elected in 1938. He was appointed to preside over an extraordinary term in 1938 and 1939 held in New York City to investigate the municipal police. He was designated to the Appellate Division, Fourth Judicial Department on January 4, 1940 by Governor Herbert H. Lehman and, following the death of Presiding Justice Marsh Taylor, was elevated to the position of Presiding Justice by Governor Thomas E. Dewey in 1959 when he retired at the age of 70. Justice McCurn's tenure on the Appellate Division, Fourth Department spanned 20 years, the third longest of any justice appointed to this Court (only Hon. Samuel L. Green and Hon. Harry D. Goldman have had a longer tenure on the Court). Following his retirement, Justice McCurn returned to practice in Syracuse, also teaching part-time at Syracuse University. Among the awards he received during his lifetime were the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws at Syracuse University in 1945 and Distinguished Service Award of Syracuse University College of Law in 1954. In addition to his Judicial activities, Justice McCurn served as the Chair of the Departmental Committee for Court Administration in the Fourth Judicial Department, was appointed as a Member of the New York State Judicial Conference, was President of the Onondaga County Bar Association, was designated Trustee for the St. Thomas Moore Chapel at Syracuse University, was a Member of the Board of Trustees of Catholic Charities in the Syracuse Diocese and was Chair of the Board of Trustees of the New York State College of Forestry.

George A. Larkin, was born in Olean, Cattaraugus County, New York, in 1878. He graduated from Cornell University Law School and was admitted to practice in 1900. He served two years as Olean City Attorney, was Surrogate of Cattaraugus County from 1915 to 1917 and was County Judge from 1917 until his election as a Supreme Court Justice in 1923. Judge Larkin was appointed to the Appellate Division by Governor Thomas E. Dewey on January 1, 1944. On December 31, 1948, at age 70 he retired, ending 33 years of judicial service. He died on July 2, 1955.

William F. Love, was born on October 26, 1880. He graduated from the University of Rochester in 1903 and studied law with the late George Raines. He was admitted to practice in 1905. In 1919 he was elected District Attorney of Monroe County. He was elected to the Supreme Court in 1921 and was designated by Governor Thomas E. Dewey to the Appellate Division of the Supreme Court in 1946. Justice Love retired from the Court at age 70 on December 31, 1950 and served as an Official Referee until 1955. Justice Love died February 18, 1959.

Robert C. Vaughn, was born in Lapeer, Michigan in 1894. He graduated from the law school of the University of Michigan and began practicing law in Buffalo in 1910. In 1936 he was elected to the Supreme Court bench and was designated to the Appellate Division, Fourth Department on December 30, 1947 by Governor Thomas E. Dewey. He reached mandatory retirement age in 1957 and returned to private practice as a senior partner in the law firm of Vaughn, Brown, Kelly, Turner and Simmons in Buffalo. He died at the age of 76 on May 20, 1964.

Henry J. Kimball, was born in 1899 on the family farm in the Town of Rutland, Jefferson County. He graduated from Cornell University Law School and was admitted to practice in 1913. He practiced law with the law firm of Cobb & Cosgrove, later to become Cobb, Cosgrove and Kimball, in Watertown, New York. He was elected the County Court Judge in 1930 and as a Supreme Court Justice in 1938 and was designated to the Appellate Division in 1947. He retired from the bench in 1959 at the age of 70. He died on January 19, 1960.

R. Foster Piper, was born in Duke Center, Pennsylvania on August 9, 1889. He graduated from Syracuse University College of Law in 1910 and was admitted to practice in New York in 1911. He practiced law in Buffalo and was elected to the Assembly in 1930. While in the Legislature, he served as the Chair of the Judiciary Committee and was a member of the Rules Committee. He was elected to the Supreme Court in 1941 and appointed to the Appellate Division in 1949 by Governor Thomas E. Dewey and served as an Associate Justice until his death on August 18, 1955.

John C. Wheeler, was born on September 27, 1886. He obtained his law degree from Cornell University and was admitted to practice in 1909. He practiced law in Corning and was appointed as a City Attorney, and was elected to the Corning City Court in 1918, serving in that capacity until 1925. He was elected to Surrogate's Court in 1930. In 1935, Justice Wheeler was elected to the Supreme Court for the Seventh Judicial District. On January 3, 1951, he was designated to this Court and served as an Associate Justice until his retirement in December 1956. Following his retirement, Justice Wheeler served as an official Supreme Court Referee for three terms. He died at the age of 96 on November 19, 1982.

H. Douglass Van Duser, was born on March 24, 1885 in Newark, New York. He graduated from Syracuse University College of Law and was admitted to practice on September 28, 1909. He practiced law in Rochester, New York and became the Brighton Republican leader in 1928. He was elected to the Monroe County Court in 1938. He served as a County Court Judge until 1944 when he was elected to the Supreme Court bench. He was appointed to the Appellate Division by Governor Dewey on April 28, 1954 and served until January 1, 1956 when he was named official referee of the Supreme Court. He was reappointed to that position on January 1, 1958 and again in 1960. He died on May 3, 1961.

Alger A. Williams, was born in Buffalo. He graduated from the University of Buffalo Law School and was admitted to practice in 1921. He practiced law in Buffalo and in 1937 became associated with Reid S. Moule who was also to become a member of this Court. They practiced law together until January 1947 when Justice Williams was elected to the Supreme Court. In 1955 Justice Williams was appointed as an Associate Justice of this Court and in January 1960, he became Presiding Justice serving in that position until 1968. Following his retirement that year, he returned to Buffalo to practice law with the law firm of Raichle, Moore, Banning and Weise. He died on April 7, 1978.

Earle C. Bastow, was born in Petersburg, New York. He graduated from Albany Law School and was admitted to practice on November 22, 1921. He became employed by the law firm of Lee & Dowling in Utica New York where he worked until his appointment as an Assistant District Attorney in 1932. He was elected District Attorney of Oneida County in 1942. In 1947 he was elected to a fourteen year term as Supreme Court Justice of the Fifth Judicial District and was appointed to the Appellate Division First Department by Governor Thomas E. Dewey in 1953. Governor Averill Harriman appointed Justice Bastow to the Appellate Division Fourth Department where he served as an Associate Justice until May, 1968 when he was appointed as Presiding Justice. As an Associate Justice, he continued to assist the Appellate Division, First Department by sitting on that Court between terms of the Appellate Division Fourth Department. Justice Bastow relinquished the position of Presiding Justice at the end of 1968, having reached the age of 70 but was certified as a retired Supreme Court Justice and redesignated for a term of two years to the Appellate Division, Fourth Department. He retired from the bench on December 31, 1970.

Harry D. Goldman, was born on March 27, 1903 in Rome, New York. He received his LL.B from Brooklyn Law School and was admitted to practice in 1931. He practiced law in Rochester and became a partner in the law firm of Goldstein, Goldman and Goldman. He was elected to the Supreme Court in 1956 and appointed to this Court as an Associate Justice in 1967 by Governor Averill Harriman. He was appointed Presiding Justice in 1968 by Governor Rockefeller and served in that capacity until he reached the age of 70 in 1973. Thereafter, he was certified as a retired Supreme Court Justice and redesignated to the Court as an additional Associate Justice. He retired from the bench in 1977 having served on the Court for 21 years, the second longest tenure of any Justice, and returned to the practice of law with his former law firm. Additionally, Justice Goldman was elected as President of the New York State Supreme Court Justice's Association in 1963 and, for many years was a member of the Executive Committee of the United Community Chest. Justice Goldman received many honors and awards during his career including the Root-Stimson award for outstanding community service from the State Bar Association and the 1966 Kiwanis Club Citizen of the Year Award. Justice Goldman died on September 21, 1995.

Philip Halpern, was born in Buffalo, New York on November 12, 1902. He received his law degree from the University of Buffalo law school in 1923 and was admitted to practice in 1924. Following a two year association with the General Counsel of the Brooklyn Manhattan Transit Company he returned to Buffalo to practice law. In 1931 he formed a partnership with his brother-in-law, Milton H. Friedman, which continued until he was elected to the Supreme Court in 1947. Prior to his appointment to the Supreme Court, he served as Acting Dean of University of Buffalo Law School as counsel to the State Public Service Commission and as a delegate to the 1938 constitutional convention. He was appointed to the Appellate Division, Third Department by Governor Dewey in 1952 and was appointed by Governor Harriman to the Appellate Division, Fourth Department in 1958. In 1961, Justice Halpern was named to the State Commission on Revision of the Penal Law and Code of Criminal Procedure. During his career he represented the United States on the United Nations Subcommission on Prevention of Discrimination and Protection of Minorities and, with the late Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt, was a member of the Advisory Council to the United States Delegation to the United Nations Commission on Human Rights. He died on August 25, 1963 while a member of this Court.

William E. McClusky, was born in Syracuse in 1895. He received his law degree from Syracuse University and was admitted to practice in 1918. Following his admission, he practiced law in Syracuse with his father. He became a City Court Judge in 1942 and was elected to the Supreme Court in 1949. He was designated to the Appellate Division in 1960. He resigned from the Court in 1963. He died on April 20, 1967.

Frederick T. Henry, was born in 1897 in Canandaigua, New York. He graduated from Cornell University Law School and was admitted to practice on July 1, 1924. Between 1943 and 1950, Justice Henry served as the Ontario County Surrogate. In 1950 he was elected to the Supreme Court for the Seventh Judicial District and served as a trial judge until he was designated to the Appellate Division in 1959. He served as an Associate Justice on this Court until his retirement in 1973 at age 77.He died on May 31, 1981.

Robert E. Noonan, was born in Batavia in 1908. He graduated from the University of Buffalo Law School in 1931 and was admitted to practice in 1932. He practiced law in Batavia until he was elected to his first Supreme Court term in 1948. Justice Noonan was appointed to the Appellate Division in September of 1963 by Governor Rockefeller and served until his death on May 27, 1965.

Frank DelVecchio, was born in Syracuse on February 24, 1903. He was a graduate of the Syracuse University College of Law and was admitted to practice in 1932. He practiced law in Syracuse until 1954 when he was appointed as District Attorney for Onondaga County. He was elected to the Supreme Court in 1955 and in 1962 was designated as the Administrative Trial Judge for the Fifth Judicial District. In 1963 he was designated by Governor Rockefeller to the Appellate Division, Fourth Department. He retired from the Court in 1975 and died on September 7, 1980.

John S. Marsh, was born on March 6, 1908 in the Bronx and later moved to Niagara Falls with his family. He graduated from Albany Law School and was admitted to practice on January 14, 1932. He practiced law in Niagara Falls until 1939 when he was appointed Niagara County District Attorney. In 1948 he was appointed as Niagara County Judge and presided over the Children's and Surrogate's Court as well as the Criminal Court. In 1953, he was elected to the State Supreme Court. During the 1960's he was appointed by Governor Harriman to preside over a series of trials of reputed organized crime figures in Utica, which became known as "Sin City" during the investigation that resulted in 22 convictions. In 1965 he was designated to the Appellate Division and became Presiding Justice in 1973. Presiding Justice Marsh retired from the Court at age 70 at the end of 1978. Following his retirement, he served as a Deputy Commissioner for the Department of Environmental Conservation when he conducted hearings on the Manhattan Westway Project. He later served as a hearing officer for the State Commission on Judicial Conduct. He died on April 15, 1993.

G. Robert Witmer, was born in Webster, New York on December 26, 1904. He graduated from Harvard Law School in 1929 and was admitted to practice that same year. He practiced law in Rochester for a short time and then opened a law office, forming a partnership with William G. Easton. In 1933, he became Town Attorney for the Town of Webster and held that office for 10 years. In 1945, he was elected as Monroe County Surrogate and served in that position until December 31, 1953. In 1953, he was elected to the Supreme Court. He served as Administrative Judge for the Seventh Judicial District from 1962 to 1968. In addition, he was designated on a part-time basis to the Appellate Division, First Department from 1963 to 1967. He was designated as an Associate Justice of this Court in 1967 and served in this capacity until 1980. During his term with the Court, he was co-chairman of the Practitioner's Handbook on Appeals and was a charter member of the Pattern Jury Instructions Committee between 1962 and 1987. He also served temporarily on the Court of Appeals in 1974 for one term. Following his retirement from the Court in 1980, Justice Witmer was appointed as a Judicial Administrative Officer and was in charge of the Pre-Argument Program until his retirement in 1984. Justice Witmer died on September 6, 2007, at the age of 102.

Domenick L. Gabrielli, was born on December 13, 1912 in Rochester. He graduated from Albany Law School and was admitted to practice in 1937. Thereafter, he practiced law in Bath, New York where he served as District Attorney for Steuben County. In 1961, Judge Gabrielli was appointed as a Justice of the Supreme Court and was elected to that position in the next general election. He was appointed as an Associate Justice to the Appellate Division, Third Department in 1967. In 1969, he was appointed to the Appellate Division Fourth Department. In 1972, Judge Gabrielli was appointed as a Judge of the Court of Appeals. Upon his retirement in 1982, Judge Gabrielli joined the law firm of Nixon, Hargrave, Devans and Doyle as Senior Counsel. He died on March 25, 1994.

Reid S. Moule, was born on April 14, 1908. Justice Moule received his LL.B from the State University of New York at Buffalo Law School. He was admitted to practice on June 29, 1932. Following law school, he practiced law in Buffalo eventually associating with Alger A. Williams who later became Presiding Justice of this Court. He was elected to the Supreme Court in November of 1958, appointed as Supervising Justice of the Conciliation Bureau in 1967 and was named Administrative Judge for the Eighth Judicial District. Justice Moule was designated as an Associate Justice to the Appellate Division commencing January 1, 1969. He served on the Court until his retirement in December 1984, and thereafter he became a judicial administrative officer for the Appellate Division's Preargument Program in January 1985, a position which he held until February 1994. Justice Moule died on March 31, 1995.

Richard J. Cardamone, was born in Utica, New York. He graduated from the Syracuse University Law School in 1952 and was admitted to practice. Following his admission to practice, he practiced law in Utica and served as the Oneida County Republican Chairman for more than three years until he was appointed to the Supreme Court in 1962 by Governor Rockefeller. He was designated to this Court in 1971 and served as an Associate Justice until 1981 when he was appointed by President Reagan to the U. S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, where he became a Senior Circuit Judge in 1993.

Richard D. Simons, was born in Niagara Falls, New York. He graduated law school from the University of Michigan and was admitted to practice in 1952. He served as an Assistant Corporation Counsel and then as Corporation Counsel for the City of Rome between 1955 and 1963. He was elected to the Supreme Court of the Fifth Judicial District in 1963 and was designated as an Associate Justice of the Appellate Division, Third Department in 1971. In 1973, he was designated as an Associate Justice of this Court and served until 1983 when he was appointed as an Associate Justice of the Court of Appeals by Governor Cuomo on January 3, 1983. He served as Acting Chief Judge of that Court between November 1992 and March 1993. Thereafter, he resumed his positions as Associate Justice of the Court of Appeals and retired from the bench in 1991.

Walter J. Mahoney, was born in Buffalo on March 10, 1908. He received his law degree from the State University of New York of Buffalo and was admitted to practice in 1934. He was a reporter for the former Buffalo Times before being elected to the New York State Senate in 1936. He served in the Senate for 28 years. From 1954 to 1964 he was temporary President and Majority Leader, holding these positions longer than any other State Senator. In 1965, Governor Rockefeller named Justice Mahoney to the State Thruway Authority. He resigned from that position after being elected in 1967 to the State Supreme Court. In 1974, Governor Malcolm Wilson appointed Justice Mahoney to this Court. He retired in 1977 to return to private practice in Buffalo. He died at the age of 73 on March 1, 1982.

Michael F. Dillon, was born in City of Lackawanna on April 20, 1927. He received his LL.B from the State University of New York at Buffalo Law School in 1951 and was admitted to practice in October of that year. He served as Corporation Counsel for the City of Lackawanna from 1958 to 1960. In 1963 he was elected as District Attorney for Erie County and held that office for 10 years. He was elected to the Supreme Court in 1973. On January 1, 1976, he was designated as an Associate Justice of the Appellate Division, Fourth Department. He was appointed Presiding Justice of the Appellate Division by Governor Carey on January 1, 1979 and reappointed to that position in 1987. He served as Presiding Justice until his death on July 9, 1991, having served in this position longer than any other Presiding Justice.

Stewart F. Hancock, Jr., was born in Syracuse in 1923, he is the grandson of the Court's third Presiding Justice, Hon. Peter B. McLennan. He is a graduate of Cornell Law School and was admitted to practice on September 20, 1950. He practiced law in Syracuse with the law firm of Hancock and Estabrook from 1952 until 1961 and from 1964 until 1971. In 1962 he became Corporation Counsel for the City of Syracuse. He was elected to the Supreme Court in 1971 and was designated to this Court in 1977. He served as an Associate Justice until he was appointed to the Court of Appeals in 1986. He retired from the Court in 1993. He currently resides in Syracuse where he practices law with the law firm of Hancock & Estabrook.

M. Dolores Denman, the Court's sixteenth Presiding Justice, was the first woman to have been appointed to that position. Presiding Justice Denman graduated from the State University of New York at Buffalo School of Law. Following her admission to practice on April 4, 1966, she became a member of the staff of General Counsel of the Panama Canal Company, the U.S. Government corporation that governed the Panama Canal and its support facilities. In 1969 she became an Assistant District Attorney for Erie County. In 1972 Justice Denman was appointed to the City Court of Buffalo and was elected to a full term of that court in the general election. She was elected to Supreme Court in November 1976 and was designated an Associate Justice of the Appellate Division, Fourth Department, on May 18, 1977. On June 18, 1978, Justice Denman resigned from the judiciary to accept designation as a candidate for the Office of Attorney General of the State of New York. On January 1, 1979, she was appointed to fill an interim vacancy in Supreme Court and was elected to that position in November of that year. On January 5, 1981, Governor Carey designated Justice Denman an Associate Justice of the Appellate Division. Governor Cuomo appointed Justice Denman Presiding Justice on November 19, 1991. In addition to her duties as Presiding Justice, she continued to serve on the New York State Pattern Jury Instructions Committee, the Executive Committee of the New York State Supreme Court Association, and the ABA Counsel of Chief Judges of Intermediate Appellate Courts. She resigned from the Court on January 14, 2000 and died on January 17, 2000. Foremost among her many accomplishments was the construction of the new Appellate Division Courthouse located on 50 East Avenue that bears her name.

Emmett J. Schnepp, was born on August 16, 1910. He graduated from law school and was admitted to practice in 1935. From 1942 to 1945 he served as a special agent for the Federal Bureau of Investigation, returning to private practice in 1945. In 1962 he was appointed to the Children's Court by Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller and was elected to Family Court for a ten year term in November of 1962. In November of 1967 he was elected to the Supreme of the Seventh Judicial District and became the Administrative Judge for Criminal Justice. He was appointed as an Associate Justice of this Court by Governor Hugh Carey on May 10, 1978. Following his retirement in 1986, he served as a Judicial Administrative Officer and as a Judicial Hearing Officer until his death on July 25, 1991.

John J. Callahan, graduated from St. Bonaventure University in 1951 and received a Juris Doctor degree from the University of Buffalo School of Law in 1954. For 20 years he worked in the courts as a trial attorney and maintained an office for the general practice of law in Erie County. Governor Rockefeller appointed him a member of the Niagara Frontier Port Authority in 1965. From January 1, 1972 to December 31, 1974 he served as a legal advisor to the Honorable Ann T. Mikoll. He was sworn in as a Supreme Court Justice in the Eighth Judicial District on January 1, 1975. Governor Hugh L. Carey appointed him an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court, Appellate Division, Fourth Department on January 1, 1979. He retired from the Court on December 31, 1999 having served for 20 years. Justice Callahan was awarded the New York State Conspicuous Service Cross by Governor Pataki in recognition of distinguished service rendered aboard a U.S. submarine during World War II. Among many other awards received over the years, he has been honored to receive the Distinguished Alumni Award for the Judiciary from the State University at Buffalo; an award of merit from the New York State Trial Lawyers Association; a citation from the Buffalo Area Chamber of Commerce for distinguished service to the Niagara Frontier; and Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities. He died on January 20, 2002.

John H. Doerr, received his BA degree from the University of Notre Dame and his LL.B from Fordham University School of Law. Following his admission to practice in 1949, Justice Doerr served as legal assistant to former Supreme Court Justice William B. Lawless. He was elected to the New York State Senate in 1964 and in 1967 served as General Counsel to the Committee on Conservation at the Constitutional Convention. He was elected to Supreme Court in 1968 and was appointed Administrative Judge for the Eighth Judicial District. He was designated an additional Justice of this Court in 1979 and as a member of the Constitutional Court in 1982. Justice Doerr served as a member of the Appellate Division's Coordinating Committee to Review Proposed Amendments to the Code of Professional Responsibility. He retired from the bench on December 31, 1997. Justice Doerr died on November 25, 1999.

James H. Boomer, was born on August 13, 1922. He served during World War II as a Naval Aviator from 1942 to 1946. Justice Boomer graduated from the Syracuse University College of Law, summa cum laude, in 1948 and was admitted to practice that year. He served as this Court's first research assistant from January 1948-July 1949. He became the Corporation Counsel for the City of Rochester in 1949 and served in that capacity until 1961. Thereafter, he practiced law in Rochester until 1970 when he was elected to the Supreme Court in November 1970. He was designated to the Appellate Division, Fourth Department by Governor Hugh Carey in 1982. During his term he served as a Trustee to the Appellate Division Law Library and served as the Chair of the Indigent Criminal Appeals Management Counsel for the Seventh Judicial District. He also served briefly as a temporary judge of the Court of Appeals. Justice Boomer was an avid hiker and mountain climber, scaling Mount Kilamanjaro at the age of 70. He died during a hiking expedition on November 14, 1993.

James P. O'Donnell, received his LL.B. from Albany Law School in 1948 and was admitted to practice in 1948. He practiced Law in Herkimer, New York where he served as Village Attorney and Herkimer County Attorney. He was elected to the Supreme Court in 1968 and on August 24, 1983 was designated an Appellate Division Justice by Governor Mario Cuomo. He served on the Court until 1986 when he returned to Supreme Court. Justice O'Connell died on February 4, 2005.

John P. Balio, received his LL.B from Albany Law School. Following his admission to practice on June 21, 1949, he practiced law in Utica until 1973. He served as an Assistant Oneida County Attorney from 1956 to 1960 and as the Oneida County Attorney from 1960 to 1962. Justice Balio began his judicial career as a New Hartford Town Justice, serving in that capacity from 1970 to 1973. He served as Oneida County Family Court Judge from 1973 to 1980 and was elected to Supreme Court in 1980. He was designated to this Court on March 19, 1986 by Governor Cuomo. In addition to his Judicial duties, Justice Balio chaired the Indigent Criminal Appeals Management Council for the Fifth Judicial District and was the Court's representative on the Advisory Committee on Attorney Admissions. He retired on December 31, 2000, and lived in New Hartford, New York and served as a Settlement Officer for the Appellate Division, Third Department’s Civil Appeals Settlement Program. Additionally he performed pro bono work and practiced law. Justice Balio died on February 10, 2010.

Reuben K. Davis received his LL.B from Boston University School of Law. Following his admission to practice on March 2, 1950, Justice Davis practiced law in Brooklyn until 1955. From 1955 to 1966, he practiced law in Rochester as a partner with the law firm of Hurst and Davis. He served as a Deputy Corporation Counsel for the City of Rochester from 1966 to 1967, and as a City Court Judge in 1968. From 1968 to 1969, Justice Davis served as Commissioner for the Department of Buildings in the City of Rochester. He was elected to Rochester City Court in 1974 and to Supreme Court in 1982. He was designated to this Court by Governor Cuomo on January 1, 1987 and served as an Associate Justice until his retirement on December 31, 1996. Justice Davis died on March 9, 2010, at the age of 89.

Thomas J. Lowery, Jr., was born in Syracuse in 1929. He graduated from Syracuse Law School in 1953 and was admitted to practice on November 10, 1953. He began private practice and became an expert in appropriation and tax certiorari matters, representing the municipalities including the City of Syracuse. He became County Chairman of the local Democratic Party in Onondaga County in 1970. In 1977, he was appointed to the Court of Claims. In 1987, he was elected as a Justice of the Supreme Court and in 1990 was appointed by Governor Cuomo as an Associate Justice of this Court. He died in office on August 17, 1990.

Leo J. Fallon, graduated from Cornell University Law School and was admitted to practice on November 10, 1953. He served as an Assistant U.S. Attorney for three years and became a partner in the law firm of Offerman, Fallon, Mahoney & Cassano in 1958. He served as Hamburg Town Supervisor from 1972 to 1981. He was elected to Supreme Court in November 1986 and was designated to the Appellate Division, Fourth Department, in 1992. He served on the Court until December 31, 1998 when he returned to the trial bench. Justice Fallon presently serves as a Judicial Hearing Officer for the Eighth Judicial District.

David O. Boehm received his LL.B from Temple University Law School and was admitted to practice on September 27, 1947. He practiced law in Rochester and, in 1967, became President of the Monroe County Bar Association. In 1969, Justice Boehm was elected to Monroe County Court and became Administrative Judge of that court before being elected to Supreme Court in 1975. In 1992, he was designated an Associate Justice of this Court. Additionally, Justice Boehm served as President of the New York State Association of Justices and as a member of its Executive Committee. He also served on the New York State Pattern Civil Jury Instructions Committee. He retired on December 31, 1998 and currently serves as a Judicial Hearing officer.

Richard C. Wesley, received his Juris Doctor degree from Cornell University Law School where he served as editor of the Cornell Law Review. He was admitted to practice in 1971 and practiced law in Geneseo, becoming a partner in the law firm of Streb, Porter, Meyer and Wesley. In 1979, he was appointed assistant counsel to Assembly Leader James L. Emery and was elected as a member of the New York State Assembly for the 136th Assembly District. In 1985 he was named Legislator of the Year by the Livingston-Wyoming Association of Retarded Citizens. He is also a past Chairperson of the Livingston County Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention Council. He was secretary to the Livingston County Bar Association in 1979 and also served as a member of the Seventh Judicial District Grievance Committee. Justice Wesley was elected to the Supreme Court in 1986 and served as the Administrator of the Judicial Hearing Officer Program and as Supervising Judge of the Criminal Courts of the Seventh Judicial District. Justice Wesley was appointed to the Appellate Division, Fourth Department by Governor Cuomo on March 25, 1994. He served on the Court until he was designated to the Court of Appeals by Governor George Pataki on January 3, 1997. He served on the Court of Appeals until 2003, when he was appointed to the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit by President George W. Bush.

Christopher J. Burns,  was elected to the New York State Supreme Court in the Eighth Judicial District in November 1995 and began his term in January of 1996. On December 28, 2000 he was appointed as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court Appellate Division, Fourth Department, by Governor George Pataki. Prior to being elected to the Supreme Court, he served as an Assistant Erie County District Attorney from 1979-83. Justice Burns was elected as a Town Justice in the Town of Tonawanda in 1983, where he served for 12 years. During that time, he also maintained a private practice in Kenmore with the firm of Hawthorne, Markarian, Siegel, Manz and Burns. Justice Burns received his Juris Doctor degree from the State University of New York at Buffalo Law School and was admitted to practice in 1980. In addition to his duties in the judiciary, Justice Burns is also an occasional speaker at area schools and community organizations. He is a former member of the faculty of the New York State Office of Court Administration Training Program for Town and Village Justices and has been a guest lecturer in criminal justice classes at Canisius College, as well as a member of the adjunct faculty at Medaille College as an instructor in the Criminal Justice Program. Justice Burns is a member of the New York State and Erie County Bar Associations, the Association of Justices of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, Past- President of the Eighth Judicial District Supreme Court Justices Association and is also on the Board of Directors of the U.B. Law Alumni Association. He is also a member of the Judges and Police Conference of Erie County, Inc. and was the 1998 recipient of the Conferences’ Jurist of the Year Award. In July 2003, Justice Burns returned to the trial bench of the Supreme Court in the Eighth Judicial District, Buffalo, New York.

Donald J. Wisner, graduated from the University of Notre Dame in 1963 and received hs law degree from Albany Law School in 1966. Following his admission to practice law that year, Justice Wisner served as a Captain in the U.S. Army Judge Advocate Corps until 1971. He returned to Rochester to practice law with Cusker & Cusker and joined the District Attorney’s Office. In 1976 he was appointed Chief of the Homicide Bureau where he prosecuted over 100 homicide cases. In 1978 he was appointed Chief Trial Attorney, and in 1979 and 1980 was designated as a Special Assistant U.S. Attorney to investigate and prosecute organized crime cases in U.S. District Court for the Western District of New York. In 1982 he was elected to Monroe County Court. He has served on assignment to Supreme, Family, and Surrogate Courts in many counties of the Seventh and Eighth Judicial Districts. In 1991 he was elected to Supreme Court and served regularly on assignment in New York County. In 1997 he was designated to the Appellate Division, Fourth Department. He served on a Joint Appellate Division Committee to Review Proposed Changes to the Code of Professional Responsibility and has also chaired the Indigent Criminal Appeals Management Program for the Seventh Judicial District. Judge Wisner retired effective September 1, 2004.

John F. Lawton, graduated with honors from St. John's University School of Law in 1955. Following his admission to practice that year, Justice Lawton joined the law firm of Mackenzie, Smith, Lewis, Michell and Hughes in Syracuse, New York, later becoming a partner. During his years of private practice, Justice Lawton was active in the Onondaga County and New York State Bar Associations, serving as a member of the Board of Directors of the Onondaga County Bar Association, and as a Chair and an instructor in Continuing Legal Education Seminars sponsored by both Associations. Justice Lawton was active in grievance matters, serving as a member of the New York State Bar Association Special Committee that developed the Fourth Department Grievance Plan in 1974, and thereafter serving as Chair of the Fifth Judicial District Grievance Committee until 1977. He was a member of the Onondaga County Legislature from 1970 to 1977, and Chairman from 1976 to 1977. In 1982 Justice Lawton was elected to the Supreme Court, Fifth Judicial District, and, on April 1, 1986, was designated by Governor Mario Cuomo to this Court as an Additional Associate Justice. On January 1, 1994, he was designated as a member of the Constitutional Court. Since January 2000, Justice Lawton has served as a Senior Associate Justice. On October 25, 2001, the Onondaga County Bar Association presented Justice Lawton with the Ruger Award "for recognition of singularly outstanding achievement in the devotion to the principles of our system of justice." Justice Lawton served as a U.S. Army Infantry Officer during the Korean War and retired from the U.S. Army Reserve with the rank of Captain in 1965. Justice Lawton retired effective December 31, 2005.

Leo F. Hayes graduated from LeMoyne College in Syracuse and the Albany Law School, class of 1959. While at law school, Justice Hayes was an intern at the Attorney General’s Office and, upon graduation, returned to Syracuse to practice law. Justice Hayes was appointed to the staff of the New York State Senate by the Hon. John Hughes, Chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee. Later, Justice Hayes was appointed an Assistant District Attorney of Onondaga County where he worked for ten years. In 1970, Justice Hayes was appointed District Attorney of Onondaga County by Hon. Nelson Rockefeller, Governor of the State of New York. Justice Hayes was later elected to a full term as District Attorney. In 1973, Justice Hayes ran for and was elected to his present position as a Supreme Court Justice of the Fifth Judicial District. During his many years on the Supreme Court trial bench, Justice Hayes was honored by the New York State District Attorney’s Association and has received several commendations by the New York State Trial Lawyers’ Association. In 1983, he was awarded the annual "Certificate of Merit" by the Trial Lawyers’ Association. Justice Hayes was appointed to the Appellate Division, Fourth Department, in August of 1997 by Hon. George Pataki, and was recertified on several occasions. Justice Hayes was a member of the Onondaga and Oswego County Bar Association and the New York State Bar Association. Justice Hayes retired effective August 31, 2006. He died March 16, 2007.

Eugene F. Pigott, Jr., received his Juris Doctor from SUNY at Buffalo School of Law in 1973. Prior to attending Law School, Justice Pigott served in the United States Army and was an Interpreter for U.S. Forces in Vietnam between 1969 and 1970. Following his admission in 1974, Justice Pigott practiced law in Buffalo with the firm of Offermann, Fallon, Mahoney & Adner from 1974 to 1982, becoming a partner in 1978. In 1982 he was appointed as Erie County Attorney and served in that position until 1986. In 1986 he became Chief Trial Counsel for the firm of Offermann, Cassano, Pigott & Greco and in 1994 he was certified as a Civil Trial Advocate by the National Board of Trial Advocacy. On February 4, 1997, he was appointed to the New York State Supreme Court by Governor George E. Pataki and was thereafter elected to a full fourteen year term. In 1998 he was designated to the Appellate Division, Fourth Department and was appointed Presiding Justice on February 16, 2000, by Governor Pataki. Justice Pigott has been a member of the American Bar Association, the Association of Trial Lawyers of America, the New York State Bar Association, the New York State Trial Lawyers Association, the Bar Association of Erie County, the Western New York Trial Lawyers Association, the Buffalo Inns of Court, Judicial Institute on Professionalism in the Law, SUNY Buffalo School of Law Dean’s Advisory Council, New York State Bar Association Special Committee on Law Practice Continuity and the Chief Judges Council. Justice Pigott has served as a member of the Vietnam Veterans Leadership Program; as a member of the Board of Directors of the Legal Aid Society of Buffalo between 1980 and 1988 and as its President from 1986 - 1988. He served as a member of the Governor’s Temporary Judicial Screening Committee between 1995 and 1996. He served on the Court until he was designated to the Court of Appeals by Governor George Pataki on September 25, 2006.

L. Paul Kehoe, received his J.D., Magna Cum Laude, from the Syracuse University School of Law in 1962. Following his admission to practice that year, he practiced law in Watertown, Wolcott and Lyons, New York between 1963 and 1992. In 1967 he was elected Wayne County District Attorney and served in that position until 1971. In 1979 he was elected as a member of the New York State Assembly and served in that position until 1981, when he was elected to the New York State Senate. He served as a State Senator until 1992. In 1992 he was elected to the New York State Supreme Court and, in 1996, he was appointed Administrative Judge for the Seventh Judicial District, serving in that capacity until March 2000 when he was designated by Governor Pataki as an Associate Justice of the Appellate Division, Fourth Department. Judge Kehoe is a member of the Wayne County Bar Association and the Past President of that organization. He is also a member of the New York State Bar Association and the American Bar Association. Justice Kehoe retired effective December 31, 2006.

Robert J. Lunn, received his Juris Doctor from Cornell Law School in 1974 and a B.A. in History and Philosophy from the University of Rochester in 1969. He was admitted to practice in New York State in 1975. Justice Lunn served as an Assistant District Attorney for Monroe County in 1976 and 1977 and was in private practice through 1994 when he was elected to State Supreme Court. He also served as the Town Judge of Penfield from 1992 to 1994. Justice Lunn is a past member of the New York Pattern Jury Instructions Committee and a former contributing editor and writer for the New York State Bench Book publication. He served on the Task Force Committee of the State Association of Justices of the Supreme Court to study the proposed re-structure and consolidation of trial courts. He has lectured on trial matters for the New York State Bar Association and local Bar Associations. In August 2005, he was designated by Governor Pataki to the Appellate Division, Second Department and in December 2006, he was designated by the Governor to the Appellate Division, Fourth Department. Justice Lunn returned to private practice on January 1, 2009.

Robert G. Hurlbutt, received his Bachelor of Laws and Juris Doctor, Cum Laude, from Albany Law School in 1964. Following his admission to practice on December 10, 1964, he practiced law with Leonard H. Amdursky in Oswego, New York and became a member of the firm of Amdursky and Hurlbutt in 1971. He served as Town Attorney for the Town of Minetto between 1972 and 1975. Between 1977 and 1982, he served as Oswego County District Attorney. He was elected as Oswego County Court Judge in 1982 and was elected to the Supreme Court in 1987 and re-elected in 2001. In February 1999 he was designated by Governor Pataki to the Appellate Division, Fourth Department. Justice Hurlbutt currently serves as a member of the Pattern Jury Instructions Committee and is a member of the New York State Supreme Court Justices’ Association. Additionally, he serves as the Court’s representative on the Statewide Committee on Attorney Admissions. He is a member and past President of the Oswego County Bar Association and a member and Fellow of the New York State Bar Association. Between 1978 and 1982, Justice Hurlbutt was an adjunct Professor of Criminal Law and Procedure at the State University of New York at Oswego, and between 1970 and 1972 he served the same institution as an adjunct Professor of Business Law. Justice Hurlbutt retired effective December 31, 2009.

Elizabeth W. Pine, graduated from Smith College and received her LL.B from Harvard Law School in 1960. Following her admission to practice on November 3, 1960, Justice Pine was employed in Washington, D.C. and New York City until she moved to Rochester, where she practiced law from 1963 through 1973. She was elected to Monroe County Family Court in 1973 and served there from 1974 through 1976. She served as Administrative Judge of that court from October 1975 through December 1976. She was elected to Supreme Court in 1976 and served as a trial judge throughout the Seventh Judicial District as well as in Manhattan and the Bronx until she was designated an Associate Justice of the Appellate Division in 1985 by Governor Cuomo. She was reelected a Supreme Court Justice in 1990 and was redesignated to the Appellate Division by Governor Cuomo and then by Governor Pataki. She is currently a member of the Committee on Pattern Jury Instructions of the Association of Justices of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, the Statewide Law Guardian Advisory Committee, and the Fourth Department Law Guardian Advisory Committee. Justice Pine is a member of the American Bar Association, a member and fellow of the New York State Bar Association, a member of the Monroe County Bar Association and the Greater Rochester Association for Women Attorneys, as well as the National Association of Women Judges. She is also a member of the Association of Justices of the Supreme Court of the State of New York. She has been active in many court-related committees, including the Committee on the Legal Profession and the Courts (the Craco Committee) as well as in many voluntary organizations, including the Otetiana Council of the Boy Scouts of America, the Rochester Rotary Club, the Ethics Committee of the Kirkhaven Nursing Home, and the Advisory Committee of the College of Business of the Rochester Institute of Technology. Justice Pine retired effective December 31, 2010.

Samuel L. Green, received his law degree from the State University of New York at Buffalo School of Law and was admitted to practice on April 3, 1968. He practiced law in Buffalo until his appointment to Buffalo City Court in 1973. In November 1978 he was elected to Supreme Court and was designated an Associate Justice of the Appellate Division, Fourth Department, on February 25, 1983 by Governor Cuomo. Justice Green has been recommended by the Commission on Judicial Nomination to the New York State Court of Appeals four times. Justice Green was designated by Chief Judge Kaye to sit on the Court of Appeals in June 2002, where he sat and decided cases. He has also served as Acting Presiding Justice of the Appellate Division, Fourth Department. Justice Green authored General Obligations Law Section 15-108: An Unsettling Law, published in the New York State Bar Journal (Oct 1983), and The Good Faith Exception to the Exclusionary Rule, published in the New York Law Journal (March 2, 1986). Justice Green is a lifetime member of the NAACP and the Buffalo Urban League, and serves on the governing board of the Albright Knox Art Gallery. He was a member of the New York State Judicial Commission on Minorities. In addition, he served on the Governor's Advisory Panel for Project 2000, and was a member of the Committee to Utilize the Services of Retired Judges and the New York State Task Force on Permanency Planning for Children in Foster Care. Justice Green received the 1995 Outstanding Jurist Award from the Erie County Bar Association and the Distinguished Alumnus Award from the State University of New York at Buffalo School of Law. He was also given the award of merit for distinguished service on the trial bench by the New York State Trial Lawyer's Association. In 1977, Justice Green received an Honorary Degree of Humane Letters from Canisius College for his outstanding work on the municipal courts. Justice Green retired effective December 31, 2011.

Jerome C. Gorski, received his law degree from Georgetown University in 1962 and was admitted to practice later that year. He practiced in Buffalo, concentrating on negligence, products liability litigation, and labor relations related work. From 1973 until 1980, he served as a Law Clerk to Erie County Court Judge and New York State Supreme Court Judge James L. Kane. Additionally, he was the Law Clerk for U.S. District Court Judge John J. Sirica. He was elected to Supreme Court in 1989 and was appointed to the Appellate Division, Fourth Department by Governor Pataki on August 14, 2001. Justice Gorski is a member of the Erie County and New York State Bar Associations and is a former member of the Statewide Pattern Jury Instruction Committee. He received the Outstanding Jurist Award from the Erie County Bar Association in 1998 and the 2000 Award of Merit. Justice Gorski was appointed by Judge Pfau as a Vice Chair of the Advisory Committee on Judicial Ethics in June 2007. Justice Gorski retired effective January 31, 2012.

Salvatore R. Martoche, was designated to serve on the Appellate Division Fourth Department on May 3, 2004 by Gov. George Pataki. He has been a New York State Supreme Court Justice since January 2000. Justice Martoche was U.S. Attorney for Western New York from 1982 to 1986. An assistant secretary of the U.S. Labor Department under President Reagan from 1986 to 1988, Martoche also oversaw all law enforcement operations in the U.S. Treasury Department as an assistant secretary under both Presidents Reagan and Bush from 1988 to 1990. Before leaving federal service, Martoche was a key official involved in correcting the country’s savings and loan industry scandals of the 1980's, serving as Acting Director of the Office of Thrift Supervision. Prior to his election to Supreme Court, he was in the private practice of law in Buffalo and served as one of six commissioners of the state Commission of Investigation, which investigates allegations of organized crime and public corruption statewide. He also served as a public defender and was in private practice for over twenty years before becoming United States Attorney. One of his most celebrated cases served as the basis of the book and movie, "Hide in Plain Sight." He is widely credited with significant reforms in the Federal Witness Protection Program. Justice Martoche is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Ellis Island Medal of Honor; the Alexander Hamilton Award (award of highest distinction given by the secretary of Treasury); Buffalo News Outstanding Citizen; and the LaSalle Medal and Distinguished Alumni Award from his alma mater Canisius College. Justice Martoche and his wife Mary Dee, an attorney, live in Buffalo. They have three adult children, Amy, Claire and Christopher. Justice Martoche retired effective August 28, 2013.